The Politics of Social Media: Rob Ford, Quebec Elections And More

To say the internet was abuzz with news that Rob Ford would be entering rehab this week – following months of controversy dividing the city – would be an understatement. The amount of coverage in social media and traditional news demonstrates how important it is to not only take care in how you conduct yourself but to also know how to handle yourself as a social media-savvy politician. At the same time, we saw the claws come out across online during Quebec’s last political election. Which makes you wonder how much they were targeting voters by knowing where they are online – especially in social media.

Rob Ford Seeks Treatment (Finally)
After almost a year of calling for Rob Ford to seek treatment, it was only a matter of time before evidence surfaced that made this a virtual necessity. This week a new video showing Ford smoking crack is further proof that leadership in city hall wasn’t what it used to be. The Mayor is off to rehab and Twitter can’t stop talking about it.
[Yahoo]

Politicians In Social Media
Thirty years ago, politicians didn’t need to ask themselves whether they should be on Twitter. There was also less concern that embarrassing university photos involving would appear on the campaign trail. Today, more than ever, politicians need to not only manage reputational risks, but also make a genuine connections with their key constituents. And there’s no better way to do so than through social media.
[Business Standard]

What Happened In The Quebec Election
They’re saying this year’s Quebec election was more than just a mudslinging match – it was a full on mudslide. Vicious attacks on either side, fueled by eager political journalists, created more than just a little bit of animosity. This election was war.
[The Star]

Social Media Reveals Political Preferences
Although the study originated from the US, a new study out of Harvard into the social media habits of Republicans versus Democrats made us wonder what a similar study would reveal about Canadian voters.
[New York Times]

Posted on: May 3rd, 2014 by

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